Paper Mache: Monster Tooth Maker Results

Steps to form a tooth

Two final teeth sitting on the lower jaw

Two final teeth sitting on the lower jaw

After much experimenting I have come up with the approach I am using for Pottie Mouth's teeth. As I learn more I will modify this post to reflect what I learn.

  1. Start with a $9 box of 500 unsterilized 3/4" x 6" tongue depressors
  2. Soak a few depressors overnight in water Jun 17 - I tried just boiling dry depressors and it worked fine so I no longer presoak.
  3. BOIL them in water for 5 minutes - What I do is put the depressors in a pot with water. Then I bring it to a full rolling boil and turn the burner off. Then I let it sit for 10 minutes.
    The boiling weakens the hard wood's lignin bond, which makes them pliable
  4. Return them to the jar with water.
  5. Remove one from the water and towel dry the surface.
    This prevents diluting the glue
  6. Select a cut piece of 5/8" dowel
  7. Cut off the rounded end of the depressor so that it will be flush with the dowel
  8. Cut the sides to form sharp tooth
  9. Add Wood Glue (not white glue) to the depressor where dowel will join
    Wood glue is sand-able when dry, white glue is not
  10. Place a piece of wet tongue depressor below between the clamp and the tooth. This acts as a guard against the clamp marking the tooth.
  11. Tighten host clamp over end
    By placing a piece of hose or popsicle sticks over depressor you can minimize damage from the tight clamp
  12. Place in the jig
  13. Let dry
    It needs to be bone dry. Exposing to a fan or air flow helps speed the process
  14. Remove from jig, remove clamp
  15. Sand any glue clumps or rough areas
  16. Fill in side between the depressor and dowel with a mixture of Sheetrock 20 and acrylic paint
  17. Paint balance of tooth

June 15. I love tuning a process as I work. Today I decided to use an end of wet tongue depressor to protect the tooth from the clamp.
I added step 10 to put a piece of wet depressor between the clamp and the tooth. I also predrilled the dowel so that I can arrange them on my tooth stand.

Using a piece of cut off depressor end to protect the tooth from the clamp.

Using a piece of cut off depressor end to protect the tooth from the clamp.


View 1 of the Jig

View 1 of the Jig

Dowel and tooth stand

Dowel and tooth stand


View 2 of the Jig

View 2 of the Jig

Tooth Variations

I made several variations of teeth. Here are some of them.

Seven variations on making teeth

Seven variations on making teeth

  • 7 - This is one of the originals. Note the use of a square cut 1/2" dowel and marks on the face from the hose clamps.
  • 6, 5, 4 - These show the tooth front of variations on 7 where I tried building a transition on the back with paper mache. The problem is the paper on the front hurts the appearance of the tooth. The backs shown below aren't very appealing either.
  • 1 - This is a 5/8" dowel with a sloped cut at top. The clamp marks have been minimized with a piece of hose
  • 3 - The side is just painted. White glue was used so the extra clumps of glue could not be sanded or removed
  • 2 - The side is filled in with acrylic paint thickened up with some Sheetrock 20. Sheetrock is a sandable drywall compound. The 20 means that mixed with water it will harden in 20 minutes. You can also get 5 and 90. As most of my drying is dependant on the drying of the paint, 20 was a good compromise

This shows the issue with trying to smooth the transition on the back

This shows the issue with trying to smooth the transition on the back


Here are the final teeth in side and front view.
Final teeth in front and side views.

Final teeth in front and side views.

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